Two Rivers and the Hand of Man is a gallery devoted to Jordan Lake. The Army Corps of Engineers built a dam near the confluence of the New Hope and the Haw Rivers forming the Lake. Of the two rivers, the contribution of the Haw to the Lake is minimal; it flows in and out very quickly. The New Hope, on the other hand, is virtually subsumed in the body of the Lake and not longer has an identity as a river. One can trace the Haw many miles upstream from the dam and below the dam until it joins with the Deep River. About all that is left of the New Hope River is New Hope Creek extending into Orange County.


This gallery, however, is not about history or geography but about the personality of Jordan Lake: its moods, its ebb and flood, its majesty and its hidden little places, and the life in, on, and around it.


All of these images are available in fine art prints. Some are available for licensing.

The Haw River Upstream Near Bynum ©
2022
Photography

At Bynum the Haw River is bridged by a defunct strudture filled with graffiti but the river itself is quiet, peaceful and serene.

New Hope Creek in Orange County ©
2022
Photography

This is about all that is left of the New Hope River. This is in an Orange County residential area north of Chapel Hill.

The Joining of the Waters ©
2023
Photography

This is the body of the lake next to the dam. On the left is the Haw River just coming into the lake. On the right is the remains of the New Hope River which makes up the body of the lake.

The Lake, the Dam, and the Haw River Outflow ©
2022
Photography

The dam is an earth dam laced with rocks. On the left is the body of the lake and the hydroelectric facility. On the right is the Haw River outflow from the dam heading toward its meeting with the Deep River.

Dawning of a New Day 1--January 1, 2024 ©
2024
Photography

I went out at sunrise on New Year's Day to capture the beauty over the Lake and to hope for a better 2024. Not holding my breath but keeping my fingers crossed.

Dawning of a New Day 2--January 1, 2024 ©
2024
Photography

Ditto as above.

The Hydroelectric Facility ©
2022
Photography

This is an US Government facility with restricted access.

No Trespassing ©
2023
Photography

There is no trespassing and the razor wire emphasizes that point.

Foggy Morning on the Dam ©
2022
Photography

Just before sunrise one morning I visited the dam and saw this scene involving the hydroelectric facility.

The Outflow Side: The Haw Rive Goes On ©
2022
Photography

After transiting the lake briefly, the Haw exits on its way to the sea.

Foggy Morning on the Outflow Side ©
2022
Photography

On the same foggy morning as the earlier image, the outflow side is shrouded in early morning mist.

The Outflow Side: Version 2 ©
2022
Photography

This image was taken in the afternoon on an obviously cloudy day.

Sunrise on the Outflow Side ©
2022
Photography

The sun was just rising dissipating the mist. The moon is behind clouds.

The Lake at its Normal Level and a Dusting of Snow ©
2022
Photography

The lake is at its normal level, just slightly below the top of its bank.

When the Lake is Low, the Peninsula Emerges ©
2024
Photography

The peninsula and the path are high and dry.

When the Lake is Full, the Peninsula is Thin ©
2022
Photography

This peninsula runs out toward the island that will be show in subsequent images.

When the Lake is Really Full, the Peninsula is Under Water ©
2024
Photography

The peninsula and its path are under water.

The Peninsula and the Island ©
2022
Photography

The peninsula is to the left and the island is straight ahead.

Farrington Road Levee ©
2022
Photography

The new Farrington Road is up on a levee. The old road will show up later.

Farrington Road Levee 2 ©
2022
Photography

As in the previous image, the new Farrington Road is up on a levee.

Stump in a Flood Zone ©
2023
Photography

The lake ebbs and floods and trees at the zone of transition either adapt or die.

Flooding of the Lowlands ©
2023
Photography

When the lake is high the lower lying lands get flooded.

A Drowned Tree and the Near Shore 1 ©
2022
Photography

Some trees just don't make it.

A Drowned Tree and the Near Shore 2 ©
2022
Photography

As noted, some trees don't make it.

A Drowned Tree and the Far Shore 1 ©
2022
Photography

Ditto

A Drowned Tree and the Far Shore 2 ©
2022
Photography

Ditto.

Five Little Trees at Hight Water--Martha's Chapel ©
2024
Photography

We had days of rain and the lake was filling up leaving new growth standing in water.

Spilling Water at the Haw River Outflow ©
2023
Photography

When the lake is in flood stage, the dam outflow is a torrent.

All Flooded: No Access ©
2023
Photography

The dam outflow has covered the walkway and it has been chained off.

The Lake Starts to Subside ©
2022
Photography

In a dry time the lake starts to recede from its normal level.

Low Water and Shoreline Erosion ©
2022
Photography

As the water recedes the erosion becomes evident.

A Foggy Morning on an Eroded Shore ©
2022
Photography

In the winter, low water and fog go together.

A Tree Tries to Hang On ©
2023
Photography

The few dead leaves indicate there was some life still in this tree that is about to go.

The Lake Subsides Further ©
2023
Photography

The lake is dropping down a lot in a very dry 2023 fall season.

The Lake Is Down More Than Ten Feet ©
2023

It has been a very dry fall 2023.

The Ghost of Old Farrington Point Road 1 ©
2023
Photography

Old Farrington Point Road emerges from the lake when the water is low. We have had a very dry fall and the water is very low. The grove of trees to the right is on what is, under normal circumstances, an island. It once was just a knoll that the road went around.

The Ghost of Old Farrington Point Road 2 ©
2023
Photography

Ditto as per the image above. The levee on the right holds the current Farrington Point Road.

The Ghost of Old Farrington Point Road 3 ©
2024
Photography

When the water is low you can see the old road from the new one up on the levee.

The Ghost of Old Farrington Point Road 4 ©
2024
Photography

When the water is really low the old Farrington Point Road is used for a Sunday stroll.

Moon Setting Over a Drought-Stricken Lake ©
2022
Photography

The lake is down and cuts a jagged shoreline for the moon.

The Kill Zone of Flood and Drought ©
2022
Photography

Where the lake floods and recedes most trees cannot survive.

Roots Struggle to Adapt to the Kill Zone ©
2023
Photography

Roots try to adapt but the trees often do not make it.

Hemlocks and their Roots in the Flood Zone ©
2023
Photography

Hemlocks are better adapted.

Hemlock Roots in the Flood Zone ©
2023
Photography

The hemlocks do better.

White Oak Creek Greening in the Spring ©
2023
Photography

Light green starts around March.

White Oak Creek in Fall Dress ©
2023
Photography

Fall starts in September.

White Oak Creek Grasses Set for the Winter ©
2023
Photography

Everything dries up for the winter.

White Oak Creek in Flood Stage ©
2022
Photography

The distinction between the creek and the bottomlands disappears.

Flooded White Oak Creek and a Flight of Geese ©
2022
Photography

White Oak Creek is a flyway to the lake.

Sunrise Over White Oak Creek 1 ©
2022
Photography

The sunrises are spectacular

Sunrise Over White Oak Creek 2 ©
2022
Photography

Ditto

Sunrise Over White Oak Creek 3 ©
2022
Photography

Ditto

White Oak Creek in Winter with Low Water ©
2024
Photography

The creek rises and falls with the lake

Sunday Socializing at the Dam Outflow ©
2022
Photography

The outflow side of the dam is a gathering place on the weekend.

Fishing Alongside the Outflow Torrent 1 ©
2023
Photography

The torrent is contained and fishing can occur.

Fishing the Torrent ©
2023
Photography

This gives a sense of scale.

Netting on the Outflow ©
2022
Photography

The fish are stunned as they come through the outflow and are easy pickings.

Netting on the Outflow with Buzzards for Company 1 ©
2022

The buzzards are waiting for the thermals.

Netting on the Outflow with Buzzards for Company 2 ©
2022
Photography

Ditto

The Other Fishermen Come in for Breakfast ©
2022
Photography

The Haw River is a great source of avian food.

The Boat Ramp at Farrington Point ©
2022
Photography

A major recreation facility

Putting In at Farrington Point ©
2022
Photography

Getting the boat in the water.

At the Foot of the Dock ©
2023
Photography

Fishing near the put in.

The Lake is Big but So is the Sky
2023
Photography

Big sky country.

Putting In at Very High Water ©
2024
Photography

The lake was extremely high and the floating piers at Farrington Point were barely able to keep out of the water. At the bottom of the image you can see the walkway down the middle of the facility completely submerged.

Very Hight Water at Farrington Point 2 ©
2024
Photography

Ditto as above.

Very High Water at Farrington Point 1 ©
2024
Photography

After a week or two of rain, the lake was so full that the boat ramps were at the end of their tether.

Sunrise and Putting In at Very High Water ©
2024
Photography

The boat ramp is almost completely submerged at this sunrise. The fisherman did not have to go far to get his boat in the water.

Life on the Boat Ramp: Milky Way Over Farrington Point ©
2023
Photography

This is a constructed image from three different exposures owing to different levels of light.

Life Jacket Zone at Farrington Point ©
2022
Photography

The rain clouds are gathering.

Flooded Farrington Point ©
2022
Photography

The rains came.

Diptych of Flooded Farrington Point ©
2022
Photography

The two together.

Sunrise at Flooded Farrington Point ©
2024
Photography

I have never seen the water this high!

How Small We Are ©
2022
Photography

Kayaking off Martha's Chapel.

Heading for the Point ©
2022
Photography

Kayaking off Martha's Chapel.

It's a Big Lake and a Little Boat ©
2022
Photography

Heading out to fish in a kayak.

Going Off Fishing from Farrington Point ©
2022
Photography

Out on an early, cold morning.

Bringing in the Jet Ski
2022
Photography

End of the day of boating.

Working the Fishing Pier ©
2022
Photography

Not catching much yet.

Please Take Out Your Trash ©
2022
Photography

The hand of man...unfortunately.